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Development patterns of necrophagous flies infesting rabbit carcasses decomposing in mount kapur cave and its surrounding primary forest in Kuching, Sarawak

Nordin, N. H. and Ahmad, U. K. and Abdul Rahim, N. A. and Kamaluddin, M. R. and Ismail, D. and Muda, N. W. and Abdul Wahab, R. and Mahat, N. A. (2020) Development patterns of necrophagous flies infesting rabbit carcasses decomposing in mount kapur cave and its surrounding primary forest in Kuching, Sarawak. Tropical Biomedicine, 37 (2). pp. 333-356. ISSN 0127-5720

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Official URL: https://msptm.org/files/Vol37No2/333-356-Mahat-NA....

Abstract

In addition to the scarcity of forensic entomology baseline data on oviposition of necrophagous insects and completion of their life cycles in the Borneo region, similar data derived from caves remain unreported. Since entomological baseline data can differ from one biogeoclimatic region to another, the lack of such data would limit the practical values of applying entomological evidence in estimating minimum postmortem interval (mPMI). Therefore, this present research that investigated oviposition and completion of life cycles of necrophagous flies infesting rabbit carcasses decomposing in Mount Kapur Cave and its surrounding forest habitat in Kuching, Sarawak merits forensic consideration. In general, 13 taxa of necrophagous flies were identified viz. Hypopygiopsis violacea, Hypopygiopsis fumipennis, Hemipyrellia ligurriens, Hemipyrellia tagaliana, Chrysomya megacephala, Chrysomya villeneuvi, Chrysomya rufifacies, Chrysomya chani, Chrysomya pinguis, Chrysomya nigripes, Ophyra spinigera and Ophyra chalcogaster, as well as unidentified Sarcophagidae. In addition, Hyp. violacea and Hyp. fumipennis were the two earlier necrophagous flies that oviposited in all rabbit carcasses decomposing in both habitats. While all these necrophagous flies were observed infesting carcasses in Mount Kapur Cave, Hem. ligurriens and Hem. tagaliana were not found infesting carcasses in the surrounding forest habitat. Complete life cycles for six and five different necrophagous fly species were successfully observed in Mount Kapur Cave and its surrounding forest habitat, respectively. Significant delay in oviposition, as well as longer durations for completing the life cycles in several necrophagous fly species were observed in Mount Kapur Cave when compared with those of surrounding forest habitat (p < 0.05). These findings deserve consideration as the first ever forensic empirical baseline data on oviposition and completion of life cycles for necrophagous flies in Sarawak as well as in a cave habitat, in view of its practical values for estimating mPMI for forensic practical caseworks.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Mount Kapur Cave, infesting carcasses
Subjects:Q Science > QR Microbiology
Divisions:Science
ID Code:87281
Deposited By: Widya Wahid
Deposited On:31 Oct 2020 20:29
Last Modified:31 Oct 2020 20:29

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